Organic Cotton Sheets Vs. Conventional Sheets, Facts To Know About Each

As our bedrooms become more of a sanctuary from a reality we did not expect, more organic cotton sheets choices are entering the market.

As we move into 2021, we find ourselves shifted and somewhat settled into our new reality, still dealing with a global pandemic.  We adjusted to the “new normal”, we became accustomed to working from home and ordering in.  We got more elastic waist pants and subscribed to HBO Max.  And, since our home was our bubble for most of us, we took time and energy into making it a friendly, comfortable place, refreshing our spaces to uplift our spirits.  We reevaluated our living areas to better serve as offices, school classrooms, family centers, and sanctuaries.  We focused on upgrading our bedrooms and reassessed our bedding.   Bedding sales have ticked up as uneasy times and the continued stress and disruption of daily life affect our ability to get a good night’s sleep.  Our comfort and sleep became paramount concerns and top of mind. 

 

E-commerce has done particularly well pivoting to supply the consumer with the needs and desires of their revised situations.  At the same time, there are more and more conscious consumers asking questions about what they are buying and how it got made. The majority of global consumers (73%) support making consumption choices based on reducing their impact on the environment; 41% say they would be willing to pay more for products using all-natural organic components.

Keeping this and the awakening of consumer expectations of transparency, environmental sensitivity, and fairness in product manufacturing, organic cotton bedding has been getting a lot of attention.

 What exactly is organic cotton? 

 Photo Courtesy of Gallant International

 

Organic cotton is cotton grown and certified to strict agricultural standards.  It does not allow the use of GMO’s (genetically modifies organisms) or toxic chemicals.  Organic cotton is farmed using a combination of tradition and science to sustain the health of the ecosystems and communities involved and uses 62% less energy.  About 80% of organic cotton is rain watered, thus using about 88% less water than conventional cotton, which relieves pressure on local water sources.  The lack of chemicals means the existing water is cleaner.  This is an important fact to keep in mind when approximately two-thirds of the world’s population may be water challenged by 2025.

The use of pesticides has long been contentious in agriculture.  Highly toxic, pesticides can cause harm throughout the production chain, from the farmers that grow the cotton, the land and water it is grown with, by-products like cotton oil, on to the final consumer. No toxic pesticides or chemical usage means less negative impact on people, products, air, and soil, compared to conventional cottons' use of approximately 7% of the world’s pesticides and 16 % of the world’s insecticides.

 

The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) https://www.global-standard.org has a clearly defined set of criteria and is transparent. 

 Graphic Source: http://aboutorganiccotton.org

Organic cotton sheets have no contact with the toxic chemicals used in non-organic cotton processing, resulting in a soft feel.  If you are one of many who suffer from allergies, organic cotton bed sheets are a great option for you; the chemicals used in conventional  cotton processing can sometimes remain in the cotton fibers which can cause irritation.  Because organic cotton lacks the chemical processing of conventional cotton, it feels soft to the touch but retains the cotton fibers' breathability.

What about Conventional Cotton?

Conventional cotton manufacturing can devour massive amounts of water.  The global average footprint of water use for seed cotton is 3,644 cubic meters per ton, which equals about 1.5 Olympic swimming pools.  If grown per conventional processes, cotton can be a large consumer of pesticides and petroleum-based fertilizers.  Cotton uses about 2.5% of the world's cultivable land and 10% of all agricultural chemicals.  Pesticides and fertilizers can cause loss of soil fertility, damaging pollution, and harm human and biosphere health.  Additionally, fertilizer manufacturing contributes to greenhouse gas emissions.  Over 60% of cotton is produced by small cotton farmers, around 90% of which live in developing countries.  They have high levels of debt, partly due to the high cost of farming (buying fertilizers and pesticides) and other market factors, and become trapped in poverty.  Conventional cotton farming can lead to soil erosion, land clearing, contamination, human suffering, loss of soil biodiversity and productivity.

 Photo Courtesy of Gallant International
Sustainable cotton production can promote soil health, lower greenhouse gas emissions and help lift people out of a cycle of poverty.  Cotton is an important crop for fiber, fuel, and food (i.e. cottonseed oil), and the income it can generate can improve living standards.
Organic Cotton at Home
Terra Thread Home offers exquisite, ethically crafted 100% Fair Trade certified, soft to the touch organic cotton sheets. We use rain-fed cotton, an environmentally friendly method that consumes less water and energy.

 

We are proud  to be Fair Trade certified, which means products are made with the strictest environmental, social, and economic guidelines.  It means that our products are produced in safe, sanitary environments by at-will employees being paid a fair and livable wage. Fair Trade is a global movement of producers, businesses, certifiers, and consumers who consider people and the planet first, working together to create products that benefit the people who made them and the land it came from, treating resources as finite.

We are also a certified B Corp. 

Being a certified B Corp means we are a part of a global business community that meets the highest standards of social, environmental, legal accountability, and transparency in business.  We are part of a business community that believes in being a force for good for their employees, environment, and community.

Additionally, Terra Thread Home is a proud participant in a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) program where we support the FEEDING AMERICA initiative for helping those who are food insecure. We contribute to help end food insecurity in the U.S. through Feeding America. Through the Tony Robbins One Billion Meals Challenge, we are able to have double the impact.

Consumers are at a place now where they are more exposed than ever to the realities of consumer goods productions and the people and facilities that produce them.  We are becoming more cognizant of our fellow humans, our planet, and the effect we have on each other and the world as a whole.  We are becoming more and more educated and sensitive.  We are understanding the ripple effect of our purchase decisions.  People are asking “where did this come from?” “How was this made?” and expecting to be answered. The days are waning where “organic” was seen as almost fringe or luxury as more and more companies in the home and apparel space take a stand on their accountability, impact, and footprint.  As this becomes more common, prices and products become more reachable to more and more people.  Consumers, awake to the realization that their purchasing choice can make a positive difference are choosing to choose products that are made in a kind way to people, communities, and the planet. 

We are Terra Thread Home, and we are committed to providing the best, most comfortable quality luxurious organic cotton sheets and supporting our communities and planet for all.

Feel good inside. Sleep well.

 

Source: https://www.nielsen.com/eu/en/insights/article/2019/a-natural-rise-in-sustainability-around-the-world/

Source: https://www.pan-uk.org/health-effects-of-pesticides/

Source: http://www.athomenaturally.com/shop/pdf/AHNOrganicCotton.pdf

Source: https://www.ghp-news.com/the-positive-effects-of-organic-cotton-bedding-on-sleep/

Source: http://aboutorganiccotton.org

Source: https://www.global-standard.org/the-standard

Source: http://cottonupguide.org/why-source-sustainable-cotton/challenges-for-cotton/

Source: https://www.fairtradecertified.org/why-fair-trade

Source:  https://bcorporation.net